Students exposed to aboriginal culture

Tyler
Tyler Clarke
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Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Published on May 30, 2014

Scenes from Friday’s community powwow at St. John Community School, during which various Catholic schools banded together to offer students a cultural afternoon. 

Boasting a First Nations and Métis student population of more than 75 per cent, St. John Community School was the ideal location for a powwow on Friday.

 

Brightly coloured in traditional regalia, adult dancers joined students in a round dance to the beat of various bands’ drums for the bulk of the afternoon.

With students gathered in a large circle, elder Wilma Felix told youngsters that there’s more than meets the eye to powwows.

Prior to students’ arrival, the day kicked off with a pipe ceremony in a nearby tipi, she explained, noting that “prayers went to all of the students and I feel very good about this day.”

“It’s a beautiful day and I’m so honoured to be part of this group,” she said.

Young dancers from various schools throughout the city joined a handful of dignitaries in starting the powwow with a grand entrance, led by veteran Emile Highway with the eagle’s staff and burning sweet grass.

Highway recently returned home from a spiritual journey through Europe in honour of fallen aboriginal soldiers.

The 20-year Cold War-era veteran, who served from 1962 - 82, told students about his trip -- an emotional one highlighted by a visit to the Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in the Netherlands.

Kids now can actually see it -- They can experience it instead of just seeing it out of a textbook and reading it out of a textbook and being shown it on a SmartBoard. Jayne Boulet

“I’ve always made it a personal goal of mine to remind people to say thank you to the ones who served in the armed forces -- everyone, not only our native brothers but our white brothers, too,” he told the students.

Friday’s community powwow is the second annual event hosted by the Prince Albert Catholic School Division, with last year’s held at W.F.A. Turgeon Catholic Community School.

“It’s important for us to hold it because First Nations and Métis is a big part of our curriculum,” Turgeon school co-ordinator Jayne Boulet said.

“Kids now can actually see it -- They can experience it instead of just seeing it out of a textbook and reading it out of a textbook and being shown it on a SmartBoard.”

Organizations: Prince Albert Catholic School Division, W.F.A. Turgeon Catholic Community School, First Nations Turgeon school

Geographic location: Europe, Netherlands

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