Students move past grad with “Christ-like” directive

Tyler
Tyler Clarke
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Equal parts learning and faith, St. Mary High School principal Mark Phaneuf encouraged this year’s graduating class of 182 students to remain Christ-like.

 

“I ask you also to reflect on the most enduring love -- God’s love, which has not only been here during your time at St. Mary, but has always been here and will always be there,” he told students during Friday’s graduation ceremony at the Art Hauser Centre.

“Although our lives have been made easier with such technology, remember that it can make our lives more complex.”

“The simple messages of Christ and God over two millennia ago rings just as true today as it did then,” he said.

The lesson behind St. Mary High School’s annual day of action is one that Phaneuf said that he hopes students bring with them for the balance of their lies.

On April 2, students fanned out throughout the city to volunteer their time at various organizations as part of their recognition of the Lenten Season, which places an emphasis on helping one’s community.

“Think of those times that you worked together as classmates and as a school and you will remember what it truly means to be connected in a modern world -- living life like Christ would,” Phaneuf said.

Every year’s graduating class leaves a special mark, Phaneuf said, noting that this year’s legacy is acceptance.

“Acceptance goes much further than tolerance,” he said. “This group has demonstrated to our school acceptance, which truly leads to a shared existence and will bring justice for all.”

I ask you also to reflect on the most enduring love -- God’s love, which has not only been here during your time at St. Mary, but has always been here and will always be there. Mark Phaneuf

Valedictorian Mark Krammer made note of this acceptance during his remarks at Friday’s ceremony.

Between schoolwork, the school’s clubs, teams and organizations, he said that any student interested could find like-minded individuals to help nurture one’s “God-given gifts and talents.”

Drawing parallels between his peers’ first day of school and their final day, Krammer encouraged everyone to look forward with optimism.

“The first day of school was not an end, it was a beginning,” he said. “In the same way, today is not an end for us. Rather, it is a great beginning to a bright new chapter of our lives.”

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