Rates drop at the Alfred Jenkins Field House

Tyler
Tyler Clarke
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Although happy to have seen positive feedback greet the Alfred Jenkins Field House’s recent membership rate drop, Coun. Martin Ring cautioned the city to remember that the publicly funded facility is in competition with private profit-based companies. 

A drop in Alfred Jenkins Field House membership rates has shown early signs of success.

 

On the new membership rates’ first day on Jan. 6, 138 new memberships were sold – a 22 per cent increase, interim community services director Jody Boulet told council during Monday’s meeting.

“That’s a positive first step on the first day,” he said.

The new rates do away with six-month and 12-month rates, sticking instead to monthly rates of $40 a pop for adults and $32 per month for children and seniors.

Comparable 2013 rates were $62 for adults and $46.50 for youth and seniors.

The rates were brought up during Monday’s city council meeting because Coun. Martin Ring wanted to know how the new rates were approved, since he was not aware that they were coming.

“We did have senior administration of the day approve the changes, and the administration of today was of the understanding that an update was provided to council,” Boulet told council. “I do realize that didn’t happen now and to apologize for that.”

“It’s not that I was in disagreement in the change to the rates, I was just a little curious how we got there,” Ring clarified.

“The Alfred Jenkins Field house, from the people that I’ve talked to, they are very much in favour of the new rates.

“It really lends itself well to population sectors in our community, that they’re not necessarily looking to invest in that 12-month program, especially when we’ve got a number of individuals who will travel south during the winter months.”

It really lends itself well to population sectors in our community, that they’re not necessarily looking to invest in that 12-month program, especially when we’ve got a number of individuals who will travel south during the winter months Martin Ring

Although the public appears supportive of the new rates, Ring cautioned council to remember that the publicly funded Alfred Jenkins Field House is competing against private profit-based companies.

A 22,000 square-foot Good Life Fitness facility opened at Prince Albert’s South Hill Mall in January, 2013.

Around this time, Bravo for Women Fitness owner Heather Bravo told the Daily Herald that it had been difficult to maintain her facility in the wake of an already competitive market compounded by Good Life Fitness’s opening.

On top of that, Fitness for $10 had recently begun offering monthly rates as low as $10 per month, with a few added fees on top.

"How can you compete with that?" Bravo asked at the time. "If I am not here next year at this time, it is not for a lack of trying over the past 11 years."

On April 25, Bravo for Women Fitness officially closed.

Last month, Curves closed, with owner Jean Burdick citing a completed lease and a competitive local market as key reasons.

Organizations: Alfred Jenkins Field House, Prince Albert, Daily Herald

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